Guilty until proven innocent?

When I arrived back in the States after 20 months in Europe, I had no way of getting a hold of my dad to tell him my flight had arrived at the airport and I was through security. I hadn’t planned ahead so I didn’t have any American dollars to call from a phone booth. I decided to do what I had done many times with a language barrier but without hassle. I decided to borrow someone’s phone to call him.
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Bring international luck to your Friday the 13th

Each country, culture and religion has an idea of what is lucky and what is unlucky.

In the US, having a black cat cross in front of you is bad luck (I had a black cat for years and had very good luck).

In Italy, being pooped on by a bird is buona fortuna – good fortune.

In Albania, having good dreams your first night in a new place is a sign you’ll enjoy your time there.

To many, Friday the 13th is unlucky, so why not bring some international luck to the day?
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Cheer for the local team! Following sports while travelling

‘Go Canucks! Go!’ is what I was thinking a few weeks ago. No, I’m not Canadian, but visiting Vancouver on a hockey game day meant I had to cheer for the Canucks in their play-offs. I don’t really care about sports or even who wins. As long as it’s a good match, I’m fine with it. But while traveling, sometimes watching a sports match is the most authentic and unique cultural experience you can have! Just be sure to cheer for the right team.
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Attack of the Egyptian red jellyfish

Geographically, Egypt has it all: Sahara Desert, Nile Valley and Red Sea.

The stunning landscapes of the Pyramids of Giza, the Valley of the Kings and the metropolis of Cairo are along Egypt’s version of ‘tourist strips’. The Nile River becomes the country’s main drag and tourists float up and down from Abu Simbel in the south to Alexandria in the north.

There is a lot to see and much of it is, indeed, along the Nile, but by stepping off the tourist trail, visitors can be rewarded with sights and experiences all to themselves.
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Book review: Iris and Ruby by Rosie Thomas

Iris & Ruby is a book with two stories.  On one side, we have Ruby, a rebellious teenager, who leaves her family in England to seek refuge in Cairo with her grandmother Iris, who is practically a stranger.  On the other side, we have Iris, 82 years old at the time of Ruby’s arrival, remembering different parts of her younger life. In Ruby’s time with Iris, both women are pushed to their limits. Ruby grows more mature as she spends more times with Iris and Iris sees Ruby’s teenage passion and remembers her own youthfulness.
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How to win a fight in Egypt

Egypt is an exciting place. Even tasks as simple as crossing the street turn into a dangerous game of Frogger. A short taxi ride can become a long detour and end being chased by an angry taxi driver who didn’t get paid for the hour’s drive that should have taken 20 minutes. One casual night in a cafe turned from backgammon and tea to a police-monitored scene. At this back-alley cafe on a warm Egyptian night, I witnessed the most simple and effective fight I’ve ever seen.
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